Skip to main content

About your Search

20130115
20130123
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
the federal law they're much more common in the state's that don't do much of the gun shows and in the state's generating some publicity i heard that open air market that i've shown you pictures of have basically closed with the promoter saying you can't sell guns there so i went back and this time shooting the video from the united corps but indeed they have absolutely no gun sales but everybody has congregated about 150 feet up against the building. he was relocated about a 32nd flock. the other thing that happened, and jamie was kind enough to mention they were kind of winding down the office in the city of new york sent a team of private detectives out and we talked to cameras and we talked on how to try to avoid detection and talked about some gun shows we might want to go to. i had one guy walking around with a camera and these guys were pros. the allies and the years of engagement that said you can't talk to anybody but they were not so hampered and the shot a video and i'm going to show it to you. >> i'm going to let this speak for itself. >> i need to see your id. >> no background c
inability as a civil society, a nation that takes such great pride in the rule of law, to in some way come to grips with the mace of of guns and violence -- with the place of guns and violence. and before we begin this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and
about is that stuff comes up from underground. new laws in colorado, pennsylvania, and ohio which release information about the hydraulic fracturing chemicals say notwithstanding any of the above. we don't have to tell you reactions, anything we bring up from underground. that's dumb. that's just adding to the secrecy, adds to the fears, adds to the concerns, and i'm not saying there are no toxicology effects in the gulf, but reviewing it with my colleagues and reviewed all previous gulf things and snitted -- submitted to the new england journal of medicine, the reviewers were concerned that we were not saying enough about how many people would get leukemia from benzine from the spill, and the answer is probably nobody, but the psychosocial effects are reel. we have to work on communicating with the public. >> just a leadership observation, in the events i've been involved in, i've always tried to use the standard of transparency as the way to deal honestly and forthrightly with the public. the problem is that if you inadd veer -- inadvertently did not disclose information, you ar
to creating pro-growth tax law that will enable american companies to compete effectively against companies that are domicile in other countries around the world we need a level playing field. the united states has the highest corporate tax rate in the world. also the united states is one of the few countries in the world with a system that is called a global tax system rather than a territorial tax system. the 113th congress we are going to continue to advocate for comprehensive tax reform that broadens the base that reduces corporate tax rates and moves through a competitive territorial system. proctor and gamble pays income taxes and over 100 countries around the world. a business tax reform should provide a level playing field so that each business has the confidence of knowing it pays roughly the same amount of income tax as its competitors in markets with at home and abroad. in terms of deficit reduction, the obvious problem that must be addressed is the problem that currently the united states has been spending at a rate that far exceeds the rate of revenue that we are receiving. the
, individual state laws do not effect whether or not this activity was reasonable under the constitution. >> but we have always, and correct me if i'm wrong, i think that we have always thought of fourth amendment reasonableness standards as being a national standard. suppose 40 states, you know, we can play the game, suppose 40 states had rules, had warrants and many of them had expedited procedures. that's still irrelevant? we don't look at that at a all? >> your honor, i think this court's decision in sampson v. california is instruct i. in that particular case the court approves suspicionless searches, and i think a vast majority of states disapproved of that particular law enforcement practice. but that does not bear on the issue of whether or not that violates the fourth amendment. >> of course, we don't know why they disapproved, and i guess your point is they may well have not permitted it because they were under what you would call the mistaken belief that it was unconstitutional? >> i suppose that is, that is a possibility, justice scalia. >> any issue in the conviction rates i
. he's expected to discuss efforts to reduce gun violence and new gun laws proposed by president obama. live coverage starting at 11:30 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on c-span we will show you inaugural speeches from the last 60 years starting at 8 p.m. eastern with president ronald reagan's address from 1981. though clinton in 1993, president dwight eisenhower in 1957. harry truman, 1949. 1969, richard nixon. then-president john f. kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. president jimmy carter in 1977. he will wrap up the night at 11 p.m. eastern president george w. bush, 2001. starting tonight at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience because it was an abortive period of history. i felt that the fdic's perspective should be brought to bear. have been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate. especially since what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for historical record to present our perspective and also i think currently for people to understand that there were d
. the past few times we've invited someone from the department of justice the federal law mandates all federal agencies shall cooperate fully with the commission. they won't send to testify at any time in the past couple of years. so it kind of the allies at least one false myth and that is that the military doesn't take this issue very seriously. so after trying to compliment you, i did want to -- i think to the vice admiral to get up to speed on some of the issues some of the biggest improvements for the kind of career tracking that i think you'll have the lead on in the media and those of us that are -- i was a very brief litigator but prosecutors and other litigators you learn to be a great lawyer by watching the great council, criminal defense working side by side, then having them available to counsel you and for the c-span viewers who may not know why if you could elaborate and explain, as i've been able to understand it there were incentives for those that entered the job corps to be assigned prosecutors but they were to be stationed elsewhere and wasn't quite the rewards of a
%, but you have permanently fix the alternative minimum tax, which in the law was going to generate $1.8 trillion over this 10 years. what's bigger? 1.8 trillion or six under 50 billion? i'll tell you, republicans should have been celebrating this as a massive victory, a massive tax cut because, in fact, that's what has occurred here. this is a big tax cut. so i say to you in terms of what has to happen next, i think it's going to require the revenue side of the equation and the spending side of equation to be addressed. let me just conclude by saying this. how do we get out of this in the current circumstance? the president said he's not going to negotiate on the debt limit. republicans say they will not vote for an extension of the debt limit unless they get substantial additional cuts in spending. i think judd is absolutely right. we have another dynamic at work here, and that is the sequestered. $1.2 trillion of across the board spending cuts, having defense, half in nondefense. republicans don't like it, democrats don't like it. that creates an opportunity. there's also the questi
in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address
's and international relations of columbia and a law degree from harvard who was elected in the michigan state senate in 1964 and served as a senate minority leader during the carter administration he was assistant administrator of the agency for international development elected to the house in 1982. for four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march, 2010, representative levin one the gavel of the chairman of the ways and means committee. in the biographical portion of the program now on to the thrilling portion. as always we are on the record please, no blogging and tweeting while the breakfast is underway. there is no embargo when the breakfast is over except c-span agreed not to use video session at least two hours after the breakfast ends. to help c-span if you're sitting next to a microphone, but close to you and if not, they will come around with a boom microphone. please to the traditional thing and send me a subtle nonthreatening single and i will do my best to call on one and all. we will offer their representative levin the chance to make opening comments and moves
to say thank you to our law enforcement partners represented by the d.c. police department today. he represents, our representative today represents a huge law enforcement presence that will be helping keep us all safe over the next four or five days. with that, matt, do you want to talk about what you guys will be doing? >> thanks, brent. good morning, everybody. my name's matt house, i'm the press secretary for the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies. our purview event is primarily everything that's happening on capitol hill on monday. there's staff involved that's been planning various activities for really about a year now. really, the preparations begin the minute the previous one ends, so our staff and the rules committee in the senate has been hard at work preparing for monday, and i just wanted to talk a little bit very briefly about our theme for monday, and then i'll start of walk through some of the logistical components briefly and then, of course, i'm happy to answer additional questions at the end. the theme for in this year is faith in america's futur
is that issue that confidentiality is the stuff that's coming up from underground. new laws in colorado, pennsylvania, and ohio which do release information about the hydraulic chemicals, notwithstanding, we don't have to tell you about anything we bring up from underground. that's dumb. that adds to the fears, the secrecy, and the concerns. i'm not saying there's no toxicology effects in the gulf, but reviewing that with my colleagues and previous gulf things and submitted to the new england journal of medicine, the reviewers were concerned we were not saying enough about how many people would get leukemia from ben zen from the spill, but the psychosocial effects are real. we have to work on communicating that with the public. >> i have a leadership observation. in the events i've been involved in, i've always tried to use the standard of transparency as a way to deal honestly and forthrightly with the public. the problem is if you inadd veer tonightly create the impression that you did not knowingly and contemporaneously disclose information, there's a discredit with the public, and s
years ago now, 1913 was the law. not to be monetary policy, but rather to address financial interest. and that's we did of course in 2008-2009. and it's a difficult task, but i think going forward the fed needs to think about financial stability and monetary economic stability, some sense the two key pillars of what the central bank tries to be. so we will obviously be working very hard on financial stability. we would be using our regular supervisory powers, tried to strengthen the financial system, and if necessary we will adjust monetary policy as well but i don't think that is the first line of defense. >> okay. this question comes from twitter. since the fed declared it was targeting a 2% inflation rate january 2012, fomc has released its projections five times but and each one of these projections of the inflation rate has come in below this target. why then has the policy been set consistently to undershoot of the target? >> was about 140 characters? [laughter] >> i suspect many in our audience had related questions. >> that's a very good question. when we have tried -- one wi
. >> yep. >> and if we had some pictures, if it was visual. >> yep. >> we -- [laughter] we know what law firms look like, we know about "mad men," but we need to see the shop. i want to ask if you could perform a sort of thought experiment which is you have a sort of magic dollar that could have as many zeros behind it as you want, but let's stay with a dollar. and your job is to, is to determine which of the many priorityies that are necessary to attack the set of issues that you've been talking about are the most logical places to invest. so it could be in communications, it could be in k-12, it it could be in this daa component that you've talked about, it could be in the linkage between universities and research. where in order to deliver on the promise of this new technology what are the priorities, and where would you put the components of that dollar? >> thoughts on this. who wants to start? >> well, i think one area we haven't really talked too much about today is engineering and the importance of engineering. we're not a culture that looks at engineers predominantly and say you'
when we looked in the law and actually read the law, it was illegal because if you tried to move a police station like ten feet to get it out of the way of the river or the land had sunk and you wanted to move it to higher ground, you would actually be penalized 25% because it would fall under an alternative project because it wasn't the exact same. so i said we don't want to build the exact same. that was the problem to begin with. some of our buildings were in places they shouldn't have been. some of our buildings were built with materials we should never have used, so why are we having to rebuild the same old thing? well, because that's what the law says. they said the law needs to be changed, we have changed it. so i hope people while they fuss at government, and i know we have a lot of things to do to get things straight, i want people to know that a lot of thought has gone into some of these reforms based on real-life experiences of what communities have gone through. hopefully the northwest -- the northeast will benefit from this as we go forward. let me just put a few mor
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15